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John Heckewelder Papers

John Heckewelder Papers

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John Heckewelder Papers




2012



Profile Description

Creation: 19.01.2012
Language: English

Title: John Heckewelder Papers
Dates: 1781-1821
Quantity: 6 folders
Identification: PP HJG
Location: internal
Language: GermanEnglish

Johann "John" Gottlieb Ernestus Heckewelder was born to David and Christina Richter Heckewelder on March 12, 1743 in Bedford, England. While initially educated in England, Heckewelder moved to Bethlehem, Pa with his parents in 1754 where he completed his education. He was also educated in Nazareth, Pa at the Christian Spring. Though apprenticed to a cooper, Heckewelder believed his true calling was Evangelical. In 1762, he joined Christian Friederich Post (1710-1785) on his journey to establish a treaty and mission with Native Americans on the Ohio River. After returning to Bethlehem, Heckewelder received another opportunity to serve as a missionary under David Zeisberger (1721-1808) to Native Americans in the Ohio region in 1771. During this period, Heckewelder was ordained as a Deacon in the Moravian Church at Lititz, Pa in 1778 and two years later married his wife, Sarah Ohneberg, a teacher in the Ohio missions. Their daughter, Johanna Maria "Polly" Heckewelder (1781-1868), was said to be the first "white" woman born in Ohio. During the American Revolution, Heckewelder and Zeisberger were under heavy scrutiny from Loyalists and British-allied Native American tribes. British forces captured the two men and tried them for treason in Detroit. Both men were later released. After the war, Heckewelder continued his work as a missionary in Ohio, Western Pennsylvania, and Upper Canada. In 1810, he returned to Bethlehem, PA and began his work with the American Philosophical Society. He died in Bethlehem on January 31st, 1823. During the eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, Heckewelder was considered one of the foremost Moravian authorities of Native American tribes. He published many scholarly works concerned with the culture and ways of life of the Native Americans, including a book, entitled "History, Manners, and Customs of the Indian Nations Who Once Inhabited Pennsylvania and the Neighboring States."


This collection primarily includes material related to John Heckewelder's missionary work among the Native American tribes in Ohio. These items include correspondence to and from Heckewelder, letters of recommendation on his behalf, notes written in a Native American language, newspaper clippings regarding Heckewelder and Native American missions, a print of Heckewelder's first house in Gnadenhutten, Ohio, paperwork from and accounts of Heckewelder's time in Ohio, including a 19th century reproduction of a travel diary from Heckewelder's first journey to Ohio in 1762. The collection also contains a deed to a tract of land given to Heckewelder in 1800, a certificate naming Heckewelder as a member of the American Philosophical Society, and his certification as the Post Master General of Gnadenhutten, Ohio in 1804.


Restrictions

nonrestricted


Related Material

Indian Missions; Polly Heckewelder Papers


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